Photo by: E-Rocks

After waiting it out, I finally booked my flight to Vancouver. In about 10 days I’ll be flying off for a week-long vacation. It’ll be the first vacation I’ve had in two years and the first since I returned from Hong Kong. Because of this, I’ve convinced myself that I deserve it. But after reading Gail’s blog entry, “How Did We Get Into Such A Mess,” I feel a little guilty. She writes:

There are also a fair number of people who feel entitled. “I work hard, I deserve a vacation.” If I had a dollar for every time someone has said this to me, I could cruise around the world…twice. People believe that just because they want something they have a right to it, regardless of whether they can afford it. That’s how Buy Now Pay Later became such a hit. “I want it. I have to have it. If I can’t pay for it, I’ll just find a way to get it without paying for it.” Then when the bill comes due at a whopping thirty-something percent, people whine about how rapacious the rates are.

Of course, we all know that Gail is right. But it’s not that I deserve a vacation less than someone who is debt-free, I just can’t afford it as much as someone else. To answer my own question, I feel like yes, I do deserve a vacation, but at what cost?

There’s a part of me that feels immensely guilty for taking a week-long vacation. Instead of spending $1,500 on a trip, I could be contributing that to my debt. But the sad fact is I won’t be out of debt for a few years still. Am I not supposed to go on vacation until I’m completely in the black?

This is when I think the “everything in moderation” belief comes to play. I’m not going to another continent and staying in expensive hotels. I’m going to British Columbia on a seat sale, staying at friends’ places/hostels and have a planned budget. If I pay everything off without paying interest, should I still feel guilty?

What would you do? Would you still go on vacation despite being in debt? Would you put your vacation money towards your debt?

Related Posts:

About these ads